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Most Unreliable Pickup Trucks You Need To Avoid

Trucks You Need To Avoid

The very reason people buy a pickup truck is that it’s a workhorse. It is supposed to be dependable and reliable, and stay in good working conditions for donkey’s years – supporting its owner in all that it can do. And some pickup trucks are exactly that, sturdy and trustworthy, and meant to last till Kingdom Come.

And then there are those plagued with reliability issues from the start. It’s killing to buy a workhorse that wouldn’t pull or haul and then has a tantrum in the middle of the road. And with these mechanical workhorses, kicking them in the behind will not incur the wrath of the animal protectors, but neither will it make them rear up and get to work. The best thing for anyone looking for a new pickup to do is to browse through reliability ratings and not be swayed by cheap offers on unreliable pickup trucks like these.

Pickup trucks are among the most versatile vehicles. The toughest in this class can haul heavy loads or pull large trailers with relative ease. They also serve admirably as “lifestyle” vehicles used to transport sports equipment, camping gear, and other items in their cargo beds that would soil the interior of a closed vehicle. Even opulently equipped four-door “crew cab” models are supplanting luxury sedans and sport-utility vehicles in a growing number of U.S. households.

As is the case with any class of vehicle, long-term reliability should be a paramount concern among those buying a pickup truck, especially those who intend to subject them to hard labour on a daily basis. With today’s pickups being loaded with complex high-tech convenience and safety features, a given truck’s reliability now goes far beyond mechanical issues.

We checked two reliable sources to help determine the projected reliability of the current crop of full-size and mid-size pickups. We sifted through data from the research company J.D. Power and ratings from the long-standing consumer recommendation publication Consumer Reports.

The good news for those shopping for a new or used pickup is that, for the most part, today’s trucks can be expected to perform admirably over the average course of ownership. However, some were rated worse than others in each source’s owner surveys. We’re noting areas of concern in the above slideshow for models that registered a sub-par score from both JDP and C.R.

Pickup trucks are becoming more and more refined by the day, and they seem to distance themselves from their traditional purposes. In turn, they’re also becoming more and more expensive, which leaves prospective truck shoppers with limited options. That’s probably the main reason why most pickup truck buyers now look at second-hand markets in order to get the best deal for themselves. Shopping for a used pickup, however, has its drawbacks. Most obvious would be the truck’s poor condition and various hidden issues that only trained eye of a professional mechanic can detect. This is something we can’t help you with. What we can do, on the other hand, is to list pickup trucks that have been known to have issues. So, here are pickup trucks plagued by reliability issues you might want to steer clear of when shopping for a used specimen.

Pickup truck buyers rely on their vehicles not only for transportation but also for work and play, and being stuck at a dealership having a recalled issue repaired takes time away from all three of those duties. As a result, owners suffer a major headache when an automaker announces that there’s a problem with their truck, which, more often than not, should’ve been avoided during production. However, recalls do happen, and as this data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reveals, some pickups are more susceptible than their competitors.

Today, things are a bit different. The average age of cars on the road is 11.5 years old, up from 8.5 years back in 1995. So if the average American puts 15,000 miles a year on their car, that means they’re going to be racking up over 172,500 miles over their car’s lifespan, up from the 127,000 they were putting on them back in the ’90s.

The good news is that modern cars and trucks can take it; they’re more robust and reliable than their predecessors and are built for the added wear-and-tear. But they can still experience the problems earlier models did, especially once the odometer rolls over into that sixth digit. And nowhere is that more noticeable than in hard-living pickup trucks. With pickups as popular — and expensive — as ever, customers are flocking to used pickups like never before. While we recently covered ten things to look out for when buying a used truck, every model has its own quirks.

Looking at some of the most popular trucks in the U.S., we’ve come up with a shortlist of trucks that can have problems once you pass 100,000 miles, and what things to look out for if you’re considering a high-mileage pickup.

Chevrolet Silverado

For a lot of truck owners, they’re either a Ford or Chevy person, and it would take a lot for them to switch sides. As a result, the F-150/Silverado rivalry is the most intense competition in America, and both trucks are built to outdo one another.

But older Silverados have just as many issues as their rivals. High oil consumption, malfunctioning anti-lock brake sensors, and an engine knocking noise on cold starts are all common complaints about high-mileage older models.

Make sure these issues are sorted on prospective used trucks. If they aren’t, be prepared to spend a few weekends wrenching on your new-old truck.

Chevrolet seems to be on an unstoppable downward spiral. The 2017 Chevy Silverado 2500HD had a strong 6.0-litre V8 that jetted 360 horses and 380 ft-lb torque. Sadly, they forgot to put decent steering in this car, which belies the whole purpose of a car, especially a pickup truck. The engine and the drivetrain had plenty of issues as well.

There have been many ups and downs for Silverado, and a long span of nine problematic model years doesn’t have to mean all of them are bad. We’ll list the biggest issues, but be extra careful with second-hand Silverados – just in case. Rusted out brake lines in older Silverados are something that most pickup truck enthusiasts already know about. In addition, millennium models have had their share of engine faults as well. Most of 2004 and 2005 Silverado problems are related to steering, and clunking noise coming from that segment is the most common of them.

2007 Chevy Silverado is probably the one you’d want to avoid, especially if it has the 5.3L V8. Apart from guzzling fuel, that one also guzzles oil. Owners have reported they had to pour up to quart or two of oil over every 1,000 miles or so. And that hasn’t changed for 2008 as well. Newer 2014 and 2015 Silverados have all kinds of issues of their own. Poor paint that’s peeling off and A/C that doesn’t work are only some of them. Shaky and noisy suspension, and automatic transmission that fails to work properly from day one are more serious issues. The way G.M. treats transmission misbehaviour as “normal operations,” doesn’t help either.

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Chevrolet Silverado

There have been many ups and downs for Silverado, and a long span of nine problematic model years doesn’t have to mean all of them are bad. We’ll list the biggest issues, but be extra careful with second-hand Silverados – just in case. Rusted out brake lines in older Silverados are something that most pickup truck enthusiasts already know about. In addition, millennium models have had their share of engine faults as well. Most of 2004 and 2005 Silverado problems are related to steering, and clunking noise coming from that segment is the most common of them.

2007 Chevy Silverado is probably the one you’d want to avoid, especially if it has the 5.3L V8. Apart from guzzling fuel, that one also guzzles oil. Owners have reported they had to pour up to quart or two of oil over every 1,000 miles or so. And that hasn’t changed for 2008 as well. Newer 2014 and 2015 Silverados have all kinds of issues of their own. Poor paint that’s peeling off and A/C that doesn’t work are only some of them. Shaky and noisy suspension, and automatic transmission that fails to work properly from day one are more serious issues. The way G.M. treats transmission misbehaviour as “normal operations,” doesn’t help either.

Ford F-150

The Ford F-150 continues to be America’s best-selling truck. However, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t come without its fair share of issues. In the newer model years, Ford has done a great job of addressing some of the F-150’s common problems.

The 2018 Ford F-150 seemed like a bright star on the horizon, but as it descended, well, so did the problems increase. While the F-Series still may be the American bestseller, the problems are there. Think transmission, engine, exterior accessories, electricals, wheel hubs, and so on. A massive seatback assembly recall affected more than 600,000 vehicles. But with more than a million recalls for a pretension belt fire hazard, this tops the list of unreliable vehicles.

It might be the best-sold U.S. vehicle, but that doesn’t mean it’s free of issues. 2004 and 2005 model years were the absolute nightmare for Ford F-150 owners. Those were the first two years of the eleventh generation, and Blue Oval still hadn’t figured things out back then. Engine problems don’t necessarily account for most of the complaints, but they’re by far the most serious issues. Spark plugs that break off inside the head or pops out, loud noises from the motor, and all kinds of other engine failures have accompanied F-150 throughout those first couple of years. Then, there’s the power window failure, which also occurs in both the 2004 and 2005 models. Finally, there’s the transmission failure as an icing on the cake. Needless to say, there were more than a dozen recalls.

Although Ford has addressed most of these issues in subsequent years, 2010 was also a bust. Believe it or not, the most common issue wasn’t engine-related. No, it was the self-shattering rear window. Apparently, the rear window would simply off itself at random without any kind of impact. Problems with transmission, however, weren’t gone yet. Hard shifting from second to first, vibrations, and inconsistent shifting deserve to be mentioned.

It might be the best-sold U.S. vehicle, but that doesn’t mean it’s free of issues. 2004 and 2005 model years were the absolute nightmare for Ford F-150 owners. Those were the first two years of the eleventh generation, and Blue Oval still hadn’t figured things out back then. Engine problems don’t necessarily account for most of the complaints, but they’re by far the most serious issues. Spark plugs that break off inside the head or pops out, loud noises from the motor, and all kinds of other engine failures have accompanied F-150 throughout those first couple of years. Then, there’s the power window failure, which also occurs in both the 2004 and 2005 models. Finally, there’s the transmission failure as an icing on the cake. Needless to say, there were more than a dozen recalls.

Although Ford has addressed most of these issues in subsequent years, 2010 was also a bust. Believe it or not, the most common issue wasn’t engine-related. No, it was the self-shattering rear window. Apparently, the rear window would simply off itself at random without any kind of impact. Problems with transmission, however, weren’t gone yet. Hard shifting from second to first, vibrations, and inconsistent shifting deserve to be mentioned.

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Ram 1500

Since breaking away from Dodge, Ram has enjoyed a sharp rise in sales for the past few years. In fact, the company was able to pass the Chevy Silverado to become the second best-selling truck in America. This success speaks to the quality that Ram has put into its trucks. 

However, this was not always the case for the company. Looking back to earlier model years, there are a few alarming issues that tend to pop up around 100,000 miles. For example, trucks from the early 2000s were known to have problems with the dashboard cracking. Body rust was also something that many Ram owners complained about.

Though Consumer Reports rates the current-generation Ram 1500 full-size pickup highly in most regards, they predict it will have below-average reliability, giving it a 2 out of 5. Since the truck was redesigned for 2019, with no durability data yet reported, we think these scores apply only to the 2019 Ram 1500 “Classic,” which is the prior version that’s still being sold. It scored a 1 for the 2016 model year. Some past examples received low marks for power equipment, in-car electronics, and the climate system. J.D. Power gives the Ram 1500 a below-average overall score of 2, with an average 3 for the powertrain, and 2 for body/interior and features/accessories, based on 2016 models.

RAM 1500 and its spiritual predecessor from the Dodge era have had their share of problems (and they still have). If you’re in the market for an older Dodge, you’d be advised to stay away from 2001, 2002 and 2003 models. In fact, you should avoid them like the plague. They were bad back then, and time is one factor that certainly hasn’t helped them out. Transmission failures, severe oil sludge build-ups, engine failures, and even cracked dashboards… Take your pick. 4.7L Magnum V8 seems to be the culprit in most cases. Furthermore, 2002-2003 Dodge Ram 1500 has been subject to a dozen various recalls. 2001 model has been recalled on no less than 16 different occasions. No need to add anything else there. Finally, the last ever 2011 Dodge Ram features below-par safety ratings and the infamous Chrysler TIPM, which wreaks havoc under the hood.

On the other hand, newer RAM 1500 suffers mostly from electronic issues. Troubles with the infotainment system, cruise control failures and radio that stops working aren’t that uncommon. Only diagnostic will cost you $150, and it’s often an entirely new system that needs replacing. Chalk another $2,300 there. Moreover, there are standard issues like various transmission twitches, electrical issues, engine problems, and so on.

Unreliable Utes to avoid

Toyota Tundra

The Tundra is Toyota’s bid to get into the full-size truck market. While it’s sales numbers have yet to truly compete with the Silverado or F-150, the Tundra still has a strong following. This is probably due to Toyota’s general reputation for reliability.

For the most part, the Tundra upholds this reputation. If you’re in the market for a used Tundra, keep in mind that the first -generation and early second-generation models did have some issues with rust. Rust could mean a death sentence for any car, so be sure to do a thorough inspection of the truck before you buy it. 

We can’t call the Toyota Tundra unreliable as such, it’s just that the Tundra hasn’t seen a new generation for a while now. So it’s a bit low on the ride quality, and the fuel economy is also nothing to boast about. The brakes are none to savvy, and there have been many recalls related to incorrect airbag deployment as well.

Tundra has been subjected to a massive 110,000 units recall for 2000 through the 2003 year models, for rust-prone rear cross member. Last model years of the first generation and first model years of the second generation were among the worse, however. Secondary air pump failure, check engine lights, and cold piston slap were only some of the issues. Dull, fading paint (especially on the roof) and radio malfunction are other things. The fact that 2005 through 2008 Toyota Tundra has been subjected to a dozen recalls speaks for itself. If you’re in a market for a loud piston-slapping truck with 5.7L V8, then 2007 Tundra is the one for you.

Tundra has been subjected to a massive 110,000 units recall for 2000 through the 2003 year models, for rust-prone rear cross member. Last model years of the first generation and first model years of the second generation were among the worse, however. Secondary air pump failure, check engine lights, and cold piston slap were only some of the issues. Dull, fading paint (especially on the roof) and radio malfunction are other things. The fact that 2005 through 2008 Toyota Tundra has been subjected to a dozen recalls speaks for itself. If you’re in a market for a loud piston-slapping truck with 5.7L V8, then 2007 Tundra is the one for you.

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Honda Ridgeline

After a three year hiatus, Honda reintroduced the Ridgeline for 2017, and it’s finally become the family-friendly, do-anything truck it always wanted to be. But the first-generation model never really caught on with the American truck-buying public, despite its compact size and versatility.

Like the new truck, the late-models shared its platform with the Pilot SUV and Odyssey minivan, which meant it couldn’t quite run with full-size pickups. If you’ve punished an older Ridgeline enough (especially 2006-2008 models), you could be dealing with a sagging rear suspension and a number of engine or transmission issues. And if it spent time in snowy climates, beware of rust: the bed is integrated into the body, making for costly sheet metal repairs.

The jury is still out for the new resurrected Ridgeline, but we already know a lot about the older trucks. 2006 through 2008 were the worst years, with ’06 being particularly bad. While ’07 and ’08 experienced numerous issues like the peeling paint, premature rust, and A/C that doesn’t work, 2006 Honda Ridgeline experienced much more serious issues. Infamous #4 cylinder would often turn up rotten, indicated by puffs of blue smoke coming out of the exhaust. Replacing the spark plug can only get you so far, before ultimately you end up being forced to swap the entire engine. And 3.5L V6 doesn’t come cheap.

The jury is still out for the new resurrected Ridgeline, but we already know a lot about the older trucks. 2006 through 2008 were the worst years, with ’06 being particularly bad. While ’07 and ’08 experienced numerous issues like the peeling paint, premature rust, and A/C that doesn’t work, 2006 Honda Ridgeline experienced much more serious issues. Infamous #4 cylinder would often turn up rotten, indicated by puffs of blue smoke coming out of the exhaust. Replacing the spark plug can only get you so far, before ultimately you end up being forced to swap the entire engine. And 3.5L V6 doesn’t come cheap.

Nissan Titan

Introduced for 2004, Nissan’s Titan has struggled to keep up with more popular full-size pickup trucks. It’s not that the Titan is a bad truck, it just fails to separate itself from the likes of the F-150 and Silverado.

If you find your self looking for a used Titan, be aware of some of the issues that plagued early models. There are many reports about the rear axle and differential issues, so check any used high-mileage Titans for axle problems and fluid leaks.

Cheap interiors, a poor fuel economy, and only a single powertrain option – the 2015 Nissan Titan was not having a good year. While the handling remained nimble, the Nissan Titan also lacked the hauling power of its rivals – thus proving to be a bit of a damper in pickup truck bazaar.

Though the publication doesn’t cite specific mechanical issues with the full-size Nissan Titan, Consumer Reports predicts its reliability to be way below average with a score of 1 out of 5. C.R. provides little in the way of specifics here, however, and the Titan otherwise gets decent marks for performance. The only durability data presented is for the 2017 model, with its lowest score being for engine cooling, climate control, and body integrity. The Titan is not rated as part of J.D. Power’s 2019 Dependability Study.

Until lately, Nissan Titan has been one of the most outdated full-size pickup trucks in the market – a feat its smaller sibling Frontier still prides itself with. When it was still fresh, between 2004 and 2006, Titan exhibited various reliability issues. The most common of them was the rear axle seals leakage. One thing leads to the other, and if Titan loses enough differential oil, the entire rear end will fail. Of course, Nissan never recalled their faulty pickup trucks, and they let the issue resolve itself naturally.

Until lately, Nissan Titan has been one of the most outdated full-size pickup trucks in the market – a feat its smaller sibling Frontier still prides itself with. When it was still fresh, between 2004 and 2006, Titan exhibited various reliability issues. The most common of them was the rear axle seals leakage. One thing leads to the other, and if Titan loses enough differential oil, the entire rear end will fail. Of course, Nissan never recalled their faulty pickup trucks, and they let the issue resolve itself naturally.

Chevrolet Colorado 

First-generation Colorado was a replacement to Chevy’s long-serving S-10. And while it shared that truck’s compact dimensions, it didn’t hold up as well.

The 2000s weren’t exactly General Motors’ golden years, and Colorado suffers for it. Owners of the first-generation trucks (2004-2012) complain of body rust, so-so fit and finish, failing electrical components, and leaky cabins as their trucks age.

But don’t let these gremlins scare you off: In terms of new trucks, current Colorado is one of the best trucks out there at any price.

Being smaller than a conventional half-ton truck, Chevy Colorado might seem like the best choice for everyone, not in need of a towing rig. It’s more efficient, less expensive, and easier to handle. Not everything is hunky-dory with Colorado, however.

First, two model years (2004 and 2005) were plagued by numerous problems including A.C. heater that only works on high or not working at all, engine start failure and check engine light that’s constantly on, water leaking into the cab, rusted frame, etc. 2008 year model has had its share of similar issues. Still, there’s the addition of a fried electrical system and faulty radiator, which contributed to the engine’s abnormal heating. Moreover, all of them were subject of 2004-2011 Colorado recall for faulty child seat and faulty brake light that could have lead to a potential crash. Finally, 2015 Chevy Colorado is experiencing numerous transmission problems including sluggish shifting or even failure to downshift properly. There’s the random engine stall issue too, so you might want to skip 2015 Colorado altogether.

Being smaller than a conventional half-ton truck, Chevy Colorado might seem like the best choice for everyone, not in need of a towing rig. It’s more efficient, less expensive, and easier to handle. Not everything is hunky-dory with Colorado, however.

First, two model years (2004 and 2005) were plagued by numerous problems including A.C. heater that only works on high or not working at all, engine start failure and check engine light that’s constantly on, water leaking into the cab, rusted frame, etc. 2008 year model has had its share of similar issues. Still, there’s the addition of a fried electrical system and faulty radiator, which contributed to the engine’s abnormal heating. Moreover, all of them were subject of 2004-2011 Colorado recall for faulty child seat and faulty brake light that could have lead to a potential crash. Finally, 2015 Chevy Colorado is experiencing numerous transmission problems including sluggish shifting or even failure to downshift properly. There’s the random engine stall issue too, so you might want to skip 2015 Colorado altogether.

Nissan Frontier

2014 Nissan Frontier | Nissan

The Nissan Frontier has drawn a lot of criticism for remain basically unchanged since it debuted. On the one hand, it is frustrating that the truck is so out of date. On the other hand, it provides a distinct advantage. Because the Frontier hasn’t changed, all its issues are well documented.

This means that if you are ever looking to buy a one, you know what to look for. The big problem with most Frontier models has to do with leaks. Customers have reported issues with coolant leaking into the transmission. This problem typically shows itself around the 100,000-mile mark.

The best way to figure out if this problem affects the truck you’re looking at is to take it to a trusted mechanic for inspection.

The 2012 Nissan Frontier isn’t the most reliable of all pickup trucks, with complaints ranging from body paint, engine as well as an erratic air con/heater. Weak wheel hubs could result in cracks as well, and some examples were also recalled over this. The ride was rough, the fuel economy low, and the cabin was none too comfortable either.

Buying a late second-gen Nissan Frontier would be a mistake due to its outdated styling (and everything that goes with it), but buying early second-gen models might end up being an even bigger ordeal. 2005 through 2008 Frontiers are pickup trucks with some of the most consistent transmission issues we’ve ever seen. And it’s not the tranny itself that’s dodgy. It’s the radiator design flaw that causes the problem. To be more precise, radiator is prone to cracking after which the coolant would find its way into transmission. Needless to say, antifreeze and transmission fluid mixture causes irreversible damage. So, there’s one great mid-size pickup if transmission replacements are your favourite activity.

Buying a late second-gen Nissan Frontier would be a mistake due to its outdated styling (and everything that goes with it), but buying early second-gen models might end up being an even bigger ordeal. 2005 through 2008 Frontiers are pickup trucks with some of the most consistent transmission issues we’ve ever seen. And it’s not the tranny itself that’s dodgy. It’s the radiator design flaw that causes the problem. To be more precise, radiator is prone to cracking after which the coolant would find its way into transmission. Needless to say, antifreeze and transmission fluid mixture causes irreversible damage. So, there’s one great mid-size pickup if transmission replacements are your favourite activity.

Unreliable Pickup Trucks

GMC Sierra

The full-size GMC Sierra is virtually identical to the Chevy Silverado. And while these models have evolved significantly over the past few years, it’s interesting to note that older models offered something that the new ones don’t: A hybrid powertrain.

From 2005 to 2007 and 2009 to 2013, GMC paired its 5.3-litre Vortec V8 to a mild hybrid system. While it boosted fuel economy somewhat, its benefits (namely an auto start/stop function) could become liabilities as these trucks take on miles.

Different transmissions (from 2009 on) and assorted electrical parts mean that keeping one of these on the road will likely be more complicated than standard gas-powered models.

Struck by a recall over melted fusible links managing to start fires, the GMC Sierra 2500 HD’s rep wasn’t all that good in 2011. There were exhaust system issues, air-con problems, electrical and engine malfunctions – the works. While the engine itself seemed definite and certain, there were far too many problems for this to be a popular model.

Consumer Reports predicts the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 will deliver below-average reliability, giving it 2 out of 5 total points. It was rated below average for 2016 as well, and way below average for 2017 with a score of 1. J.D. Power’s 2019 Dependability Study, based on surveyed owners of 2016 models, gives the Sierra 1500 a ranking of 2 overall, with a 2 for powertrain durability, and an average 3 for body/interior and features/accessories. On the other hand, the truck’s mechanical equivalent, the Chevrolet Silverado 1500, fares better in JDP’s report with 4 points overall, so perhaps GMC owners are just fussier.

The heavy-duty versions of the 2019 GMC Sierra get rock bottom marks for predicted reliability from Consumer Reports, a 1 out of 5. It gets the same score for three-year-old examples from the 2016 model year. C.R.’s owner surveys report they’ve encountered problems in some model years with the transmission (minor), fuel system, suspension, brakes, and exhaust. JDP ranks it a tad higher, giving the Sierra HD a 33 overall, a 5 for the powertrain, 3 for body/interior, and a 2 for features/accessories. Again, the Chevy versions scored higher in the J.D. Power survey, with perfect scores of 5 across the board.

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Toyota Tacoma

For over 20 years, the Toyota Tacoma has been the king of the mid-size market. Thanks to its compact size, near full-size capability, and bulletproof reliability, the Tacoma has proven to be about as much truck as anyone needs.

But that changed in 2016 when Toyota replaced the long-serving model with an all-new one. Since then, the Tacoma has earned itself Consumer Reports’ “Worst Buy” rating, due to issues like leaking differentials, a low-quality interior, and poor steering feel.

The truck is still mechanically bulletproof, but we hope Toyota sorts out these issues sooner rather than later.

Due to low interest for the mid-size pickup segment on Big Trio’s part, Toyota Tacoma surfaced as a leader in the segment. Although it’s generally a reliable truck, Tacoma’s been a subject of a massive 700,000 vehicle recall for 2005 through 2011 models. Leaf springs at the back we’re prone to corrosion, which could have lead to the fracturing and coming into impact with other parts of the truck, like the fuel tank.

Older models were generally prone to rust and came with awful quality paint that used to peel like an apple. Then, there are engine problems like sudden acceleration or failure, while numerous Tacoma owners complained about the 2009 year models’ radio that turns off at random. While 2016 Toyota Tacoma is finally all-new and redesigned, that didn’t stop new problems from emerging. People complain about the loud annoying noise coming from the driver’s side door while cruising at highway speeds. Moreover, engine vibrations and slow automatic transmission engagement while cold will have to be addressed.

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